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Wednesday, October 20, 2010

New York Leandra’s Law: Beware the DWIs

It's always the time to be careful when driving in New York, especially now that Leandra's law is in effect. What exactly is Leandra’s Law?

Leandra's Law (Child Passenger Protection Act) is a New York State law making it an automatic felony on the first offense to drive drunk with a person under the age of 15 inside the vehicle, and setting the blood alcohol content, or BAC, at 0.08. The bill was unanimously passed by the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate and then signed into law by Gov. David Paterson on November 18, 2009.


Nearly one year in effect, it means that even first-time DWI offenders are going to be required to install an ignition-interlock device that would prohibit them from starting the car while intoxicated. This law was created to prevent the endangerment of the welfare of children by intoxicated drivers.

Don Prudente, president of the DriveSafe Ignition Interlock of New York claims that these devices are so sensitive, that even blowing a .025 won't allow them to start the vehicle. If the driver has been drinking the night before, it may reflect the following morning with them not being able to start their vehicles.

Some may claim that it's too harsh a punishment, but then again, what would be worse, an ignition-interlock device, or endangering the life of a child?

Learn more about the New York Child Passenger Protection Act

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